Читаю сейчас книжку про историю ФБР с фокусом на политический сыск. Где-то я все это уже видел: 

Senator Wheeler’s April 1923 expedition to Russia left him half convinced that capitalism and freedom of religion might emerge from the chaos and terror of the revolution. On his return to the United States, the senator said he would support diplomatic recognition. The attorney general was outraged.

“My image as a Bolshevik grew in his mind,” Wheeler recounted. [Attorney General Harry M.] Daugherty denounced Wheeler, first privately, then publicly, as “the Communist leader in the Senate” and “no more a Democrat than Stalin, his comrade, in Moscow.” He called him “part of an effort to capture, by deceit and design, as many members of the Senate as possible and to spread through Washington and the cloakrooms of Congress a poison gas as deadly as that which sapped and destroyed brave soldiers in the last war.”

Hoover’s own role in the political battle against Russian recognition was more subtle. He carefully fed documents from the Bureau’s files to trusted politicians and privately financed anti-Communist crusaders. He helped a former Associated Press reporter named Richard Whitney research a series of incendiary articles, later collected in a book, Reds in America, in which Whitney gratefully acknowledged Hoover’s personal assistance. Whitney argued that Soviet agents had an all-pervasive influence over American institutions; they had infiltrated every corner of American life. He called the Bridgman meeting a key moment in “the most colossal conspiracy against the United States in its history.” He looked at the silent-movie studios of Hollywood and named Charlie Chaplin as a secret Communist. He charged his alma mater, Harvard, with harboring Communist sympathizers like Felix Frankfurter. He warned that the Comintern’s political agents in America were spearheading the Senate’s move to recognize Russia.

The movement toward Russian recognition halted; it would not revive for a decade.

Tim Weiner – Enemies